Table of Contents > Interactions & Depletions > Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) Print

Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus)



Interactions

Mastic/Drug Interactions:
  • ACE inhibitorsACE inhibitors: The potential actions of procyanidin polymer compounds from Pistacia lentiscus, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antihypertensive effects, have been discussed in laboratory research (18; 19). However, available research has found these compounds to be present in the leaf of Pistacia lentiscus, not the resin, commonly referred to as mastic.
  • AnthelminticsAnthelmintics: In goats, Pistacia lentiscus L. (lentisk) had anthelmintic activity (36; 37).
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: In human and animal research, mastic gum has demonstrated antibiotic effects against oral bacteria (38; 28; 39) and other bacteria, such as Helicobacter pylori (34; 40), Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella melaninogenica (41; 42; 43), and Streptococcus mutans and mutans streptococci (28; 43).
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: In human research, methyl oleanonate, a constituent of Pistacia lentiscus, was a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonist in vitro (8). PPAR-gamma has been implicated in diabetes. The effect on blood glucose is unclear. However, in separate research, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased blood glucose in males (20).
  • Antifungal agentsAntifungal agents: Ali-Shtayeh et al. studied the antifungal properties and minimum inhibitory concentrations of 22 plants used in Palestinian folk medicine in vitro (3). The investigators found Pistacia lentiscus to be one of the most active extracts in vitro against Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton violaceum. In vitro, essential oils and other constituents from Pistacia lentiscus had antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium commune, Fusarium oxysporum, and Aspergillus flavus (44), and Candida albicans (43).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: Potential actions of procyanidin polymer compounds from Pistacia lentiscus, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and antihypertensive properties, have been discussed in laboratory research (18; 19). However, available research has found these compounds to be present in the leaf of Pistacia lentiscus, not the resin, commonly referred to as mastic.
  • Anti-inflammatory agentsAnti-inflammatory agents: In animal research, mastic gum had anti-inflammatory effects in an edema model (4) and an asthma model (5). The anti-inflammatory effects of chios mastic gum have been shown in vitro. Mastic gum inhibited cellular production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells and inhibited the activity of protein kinase C in endothelial cells (45). In macrophages, mastic inhibited the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandins while inhibiting the expression of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (46). In human aortic endothelial cells, chios mastic gum extract, and the constituent tirucallol, inhibited vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression following TNF-alpha stimulation and the binding of U937 cells to TNF-alpha-stimulated human aortic endothelial cells while attenuating the phosphorylation of NFkB p65 (47).
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: In human research, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, the total cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio, lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein A-1, and apolipoprotein B (20).
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: In animal research, mastic oil decreased tumor growth in a tumor model (7). In vitro, gum mastic potentiated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells (48). In human K562 leukemia cells, mastic oil inhibited the growth and survival and attenuated angiogenesis (49). Mastic oil also caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation without affecting cell survival. In vitro, a 50% ethanol extract of mastic gum had antiproliferative apoptotic activity in HCT116 human colon cells (50).
  • Antiulcer agentsAntiulcer agents: In animal research, chios mastic gum extracts were antibacterial against Helicobacter pylori (40). Through animal and in vitro investigations, it is hypothesized that mastic exhibits antisecretory and cytoprotective effects on the gastric and duodenal mucosa (51; 2).
  • Dental and periodontal agentsDental and periodontal agents: In human research, mastic gum had antibiotic effects against oral bacteria (38; 28; 39).
  • Gastrointestinal agentsGastrointestinal agents: In animal research, mastic powder improved colitis and colonic indices (52). In animal research, chios mastic gum extracts were antibacterial against Helicobacter pylori but were without effect on associated chronic inflammatory infiltration or chronic gastritis (40). In vitro, chios mastic gum and extracted arabinogalactan proteins inhibited neutrophil activation (21; 22; 23). These authors suggested that mastic gum inhibition of neutrophil activation may play a role in the anti-inflammatory effects of mastic gum against Helicobacter pylori.
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: In vitro, chios mastic gum and extracted arabinogalactan proteins inhibited neutrophil activation (21; 22; 23).
  • Iron saltsIron salts: In animal research, a fiber mixture containing arabic gum (mastic) lacked negative effects on growth or iron absorption (33).
  • Wound-healing agentsWound-healing agents: In animal research, the virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus accelerated wound healing and epithelialization in a burn model (53).

Mastic/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • ACE inhibitorsACE inhibitors: The potential actions of procyanidin polymer compounds from Pistacia lentiscus, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and antihypertensive properties, have been discussed in laboratory research (18; 19). However, available research has found these compounds to be present in the leaf of Pistacia lentiscus, not the resin, commonly referred to as mastic.
  • AnthelminticsAnthelmintics: In goats, Pistacia lentiscus L. (lentisk) had anthelmintic activity (36; 37).
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: In human and animal research, mastic gum had antibacterial effects against oral bacteria (38; 28; 39) and other bacteria, such as Helicobacter pylori (34; 40), Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella melaninogenica (41; 42; 43) and Streptococcus mutans and mutans streptococci (28; 43).
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: Ali-Shtayeh et al. studied the antifungal properties and minimum inhibitory concentrations of 22 plants used in Palestinian folk medicine in vitro (3). The investigators found Pistacia lentiscus to be one of the most active extracts in vitro against Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton violaceum. In vitro, essential oils and other constituents from Pistacia lentiscus had antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium commune, Fusarium oxysporum, and Aspergillus flavus (44), and Candida albicans (43).
  • Anti-inflammatory herbs and supplementsAnti-inflammatory herbs and supplements: In animal research, mastic gum had anti-inflammatory effects in an edema model (4) and an asthma model (5). The anti-inflammatory effects of chios mastic gum have been shown in vitro. Mastic gum inhibited cellular production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells and inhibited the activity of protein kinase C in endothelial cells (45). In macrophages, mastic inhibited the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandins while inhibiting the expression of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (46). In human aortic endothelial cells, chios mastic gum extract, and the constituent tirucallol, inhibited vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression following TNF-alpha stimulation and the binding of U937 cells to TNF-alpha-stimulated human aortic endothelial cells while attenuating the phosphorylation of NFkB p65 (47).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In human research, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, the total cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio, lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein A-1, and apolipoprotein B (20).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: In animal research, mastic oil decreased tumor growth in a tumor model (7). In vitro, gum mastic potentiated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells (48). In human K562 leukemia cells, mastic oil inhibited the growth and survival and attenuated angiogenesis (49). Mastic oil also caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation without affecting cell survival. In vitro, a 50% ethanol extract of mastic gum had antiproliferative apoptotic activity in HCT116 human colon cells (50).
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: In mastic, the total phenolics, calculated as gallic acid equivalent, were 147.68mg of gallic acid equivalents per gram of dry weight, and the total phenolics was related to the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (54). Gum mastic had weak diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical (DPPH)- and nitric oxide-scavenging activities and good iron-chelating activity in mice (4). Mastic reduced malondialdehyde levels in animal research (52). The antioxidant effects of mastic constituents, such as digallic acid and anthocyanins, have been shown in other in vitro studies (55; 56; 44; 57).
  • Antiulcer herbs and supplementsAntiulcer herbs and supplements: In animal research, chios mastic gum extracts were antibacterial against Helicobacter pylori (40). Through animal and in vitro investigations, it is hypothesized that mastic exhibits antisecretory and cytoprotective effects on the gastric and duodenal mucosa (51; 2).
  • BerberineBerberine: Arabic gum (mastic gum) did not affect the absorption of berberine in animal research (58).
  • Dental agentsDental agents: In human research, mastic gum had antibiotic effects against oral bacteria (38; 28; 39).
  • Gastrointestinal agentsGastrointestinal agents: In animal research, mastic powder improved colitis and colonic indices (52). In animal research, chios mastic gum extracts were antibacterial against Helicobacter pylori but were without effect on associated chronic inflammatory infiltration or chronic gastritis (40). In vitro, chios mastic gum and extracted arabinogalactan proteins inhibited neutrophil activation (21; 22; 23). These authors suggested that mastic gum inhibition of neutrophil activation may play a role in the anti-inflammatory effects of mastic gum against Helicobacter pylori.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: Petersen et al. determined that methyl oleanonate, a constituent of Pistacia lentiscus, was a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonist in vitro (8). PPAR-gamma has been implicated in diabetes. The effect on blood glucose is unclear. However, in separate research, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased blood glucose in males (20).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: The potential actions of procyanidin polymer compounds from Pistacia lentiscus, such as angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibition and antihypertensive properties, have been discussed in laboratory research (18; 19). However, available research has found these compounds to be present in the leaf of Pistacia lentiscus, not the resin, commonly referred to as mastic.
  • ImmunomodulatorsImmunomodulators: In vitro, chios mastic gum and extracted arabinogalactan proteins inhibited neutrophil activation (21; 22; 23).
  • IronIron: In animal research, a fiber mixture containing arabic gum (mastic) had no negative effects on growth or iron absorption (33).
  • Wound-healing herbs and supplementsWound-healing herbs and supplements: In animal research, the virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus accelerated wound healing and epithelialization in a burn model (53).
  • ZincZinc: In human research, chewing of a gum containing chios mastic resulted in a small amount of about 0.7mg/kg of zinc in the mouth and gastrointestinal system after four hours' chewing time (59).

Mastic/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Mastic/Lab Interactions:
  • Antioxidant levelsAntioxidant levels: Mastic reduced malondialdehyde levels (formed when reactive oxygen species degrade polyunsaturated lipids) in animal research (52).
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: The potential actions of procyanidin polymer compounds from Pistacia lentiscus, such as angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibition and antihypertensive properties, have been discussed in laboratory research (18; 19). However, available research has found these compounds to be present in the leaf of Pistacia lentiscus, not the resin, commonly referred to as mastic.
  • CytokinesCytokines: Mastic and its constituents have been shown to decrease cellular and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (5; 52).
  • GlucoseGlucose: Petersen et al. determined that methyl oleanonate, a constituent of Pistacia lentiscus, was a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonist in vitro (8). PPAR-gamma has been implicated in diabetes. The effect on blood glucose is unclear. However, in separate study, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased blood glucose in males (20).
  • Liver enzymesLiver enzymes: In human research, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GT) (20).
  • Nitric oxideNitric oxide: In macrophages, mastic inhibited the production of nitric oxide (46).
  • Plasma lipoproteinsPlasma lipoproteins: In human research, 5g of mastic powder daily decreased serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, the total cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio, lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein A-1, and apolipoprotein B (20).
  • ProstaglandinsProstaglandins: In macrophages, mastic inhibited the production of prostaglandins (46).
  • ZincZinc: In human research, chewing of a gum containing chios mastic resulted in a small amount of about 0.7mg/kg of zinc in the mouth and gastrointestinal system after four hours' chewing time (59).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

    Delicious Living
    Top Health
    Conditions
    To learn more, select a condition from the following menu.

    Healthy Living Marketplace
    Olbas
    Garden Of Life
    Now Food
    Wakunaga of America
    American Health
    Almased