Table of Contents > Herbs & Supplements > Angostura (Galipea officinalis, Angostura trifoliata) Print

Angostura (Galipea officinalis, Angostura trifoliata)

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Also listed as: Galipea officinalis, Angostura trifoliata, Cusparia febrifuga, Cusparia trifoliata
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Allocspariene, Angostura trifoliata, Angostura trifoliate, Bonplandia trifoliata Willd., candicine, Cusparia febrifuga Humb. ex DC., Cusparia felorifuga, Cusparia trifoliata (Willd.) Engl., Galipea, Galipea officinalis, galipinine, quinolones, Rutaceae (family), tetrahydroquinolines.

Background
  • Angostura (Galipea officinalis, Angostura trifoliata) is a shrub-like tree that has been studied for its potential antibiotic and cytotoxic (cell killing) activity. The bark is thought to be the main source of its medicinal properties.
  • Although the angostura tree and Angostura® aromatic bitters bear the same name, the bitters were named after the city, Angostura, Venezuela, and the proprietary formula is not said to contain angostura.
  • There is not enough human data available to support the use of angostura for any indication.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Antibacterial, cancer, digestive, malaria, tuberculosis.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for angostura.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for angostura.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to angostura, its constituents, or members of the Rutaceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Angostura should be used with caution in patients taking antibiotics or being treated for tuberculosis.
  • Angostura should be used with caution in patients taking anti-cancer or anti-malaria drugs.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Angostura cannot be recommended during pregnancy or breastfeeding due to a lack of scientific safety data.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Angostura may interact with anti-malaria or anti-cancer drugs.
  • Angostura may interact with antibiotics that fight tuberculosis-causing bacteria.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Angostura may interact with herbs and supplements that have activity against malaria and the bacteria that cause tuberculosis.
  • Angostura may interact with herbs and supplements with anti-cancer activity.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Houghton PJ, Woldemariam TZ, Watanabe Y, et al. Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis of alkaloid constituents of Angostura bark, Galipea officinalis. Planta Med 1999;65(3):250-254.
  2. Jacquemond-Collet I, Benoit-Vical F, Valentin A, et al. Antiplasmodial and cytotoxic activity of galipinine and other tetrahydroquinolines from Galipea officinalis. Planta Med 2002;68(1):68-69.
  3. Jacquemond-Collet I, Bessiere JM, Hannedouche S, et al. Identification of the alkaloids of Galipea officinalis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Phytochem Anal 2001;12(5):312-319.
  4. Jacquemond-Collet I, Hannedouche S, Fouraste I, et al. Novel quinoline alkaloid from trunk bark of Galipea officinalis. Fitoterapia 2000;71(5):605-606.
  5. Rakotoson JH, Fabre N, Jacquemond-Collet I, et al. Alkaloids from Galipea officinalis. Planta Med 1998;64(8):762-763.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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