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Liverwort (Hepatica ssp.)

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Also listed as: Hepatica
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Hepatica, Hepatica nobilis, Hepatica transsilvanica, liverleaf, Ranunculaceae (family), sesquiterpene lactone.
  • Note: Liverwort (Hepatica ssp.) should not be confused with Jungermannia ssp., Bazzania ssp., Lepidolaena ssp., Marchantia ssp., Riccardia ssp., Plagiochila ssp., or Frullania ssp., although they are also commonly called liverworts.

Background
  • Liverwort (Hepatica ssp.) is the common name for a genus of herbaceous perennial plants native to central and northern Europe, Asia, and northeastern North America. Liverwort (Hepatica ssp.) should not be confused with Jungermannia ssp., Bazzania ssp., Lepidolaena ssp., Marchantia ssp., Riccardia ssp., Plagiochila ssp., or Frullania ssp., although they are also commonly called liverworts. There is little scientific evidence currently available on the uses of liverwort. One laboratory study indicates that derivatives of liverwort may affect lipid (fat) homeostasis. Liverwort is not listed on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to liverwort. Liverwort may cause contact hypersensitivity, such as skin rash.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • There is very little available information reported on adverse effects. Liverwort is not listed on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list. Use cautiously in patients sensitive to liverwort. In a case report, liverwort was associated with contact hypersensitivity.
  • Use cautiously in patients with hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol) as liverwort may alter lipid levels.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Liverwort is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Liverwort may alter serum lipid levels (fat levels in the blood). Use cautiously with cholesterol-lowering medications, due to possible additive effects.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Liverwort may alter serum lipid levels (fat levels in the blood). Use cautiously with cholesterol-lowering herbs and supplements, due to possible additive effects.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Knoche H, Ourisson G, Perold GW, et al. Allergenic component of a liverwort: a sesquiterpene lactone. Science 10-10-1969;166(902):239-240.
  2. Storrs FJ, Mitchell JC, Rasmussen JE. Contact hypersensitivity to liverwort and the compositae family of plants. Cutis 1976;18(5):681-686.
  3. Tamehiro N, Sato Y, Suzuki T, et al. Riccardin C: a natural product that functions as a liver X receptor (LXR)alpha agonist and an LXRbeta antagonist. FEBS Lett 10-10-2005;579(24):5299-5304.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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